THE JACOBITE DATABASE OF 1745

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Lurking Within Our Bounds
A paper by invitation from renowned Jacobite scholar, Allan Macinnes, Lurking Within Our Bounds explores methodology and taxonomy of information within The Jacobite Database of 1745 before offering a number of case studies relevant to the Scottish liturgical tradition. In addition to demonstrating the results of a basic query using search terms apposite to Catholic and non-juring Episcopal ministers during the 'Forty-five, their Presbyterian counterparts who were used as watchdogs for the Hanoverian government are also examined. A detailed analysis of the subscriber list for Bishop Thomas Rattray's Liturgy of St James then illustrates patterns of Jacobite support within the non-juring Episcopal laity by cross-referencing them with known Jacobites from the database. Finally, the socio-economic atmosphere in Edinburgh during its years of civil war reveals the mania wrought against all forms of religious dissenters, subsuming the political and mercantile sectors in fear of Original Sin.

Scottish Liturgical Tradition
and the Jacobite Church 1540-1764
Monday, 23 June 2014
The Old Brewery
Cromarty IV11 8XQ

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Honor's War We Strongly Waged
Like the Scottish soldiers on both sides of the field at Culloden whose loyalties were divided in Britain’s last civil war, so too were opinions – both public and private – about the legitimacy of the Jacobite cause and the professionalism of its army in both 1715 and 1745. Even in modern memory, the battle rages on between perceptions of Jacobitism in ‘rising’ or ‘rebellion’ and its military arm as a well-trained and disciplined force or simply a mob of ‘sillie boies sent to opress us’. Moving beyond the popular wartime propaganda used on both sides of the Jacobite conflicts, objective analysis of the conduct of the Stuarts’ armies is rare, even amidst the large volume of Jacobite scholarship currently available. Did the soldiers under the Earl of Mar in 1715 and Charles Edward Stuart in 1745 acquit themselves with ‘honourable’ behaviour during their respective campaigns? How did the conduct of the armies inform public perception of each as either forces of occupation or liberation? Regardless of whether Jacobitism was a legitimate cause or movement, it was indeed a legitimate threat to the Hanoverian regime as evidenced by the shocking depredations after Sheriffmuir and Culloden. These themes will be examined using a variety of primary source material including private letters, public manifestos, military correspondence, as well as period newspapers and broadsheets.

National Trust for Scotland
Culloden Battlefield
Saturday, 5 October 2013
Culloden Visitor Centre
Culloden Moor
Inverness IV2 5EU

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"Virtuous Rabble" & Virtual Rebels - Digital Humanities and the Jacobite Database of 1745
This paper is an introduction to a new codification of the Jacobite record. Utilising a modern and acutely-designed online database to compile and document the constituency of the Jacobite movement during the rising of 1745-6, the goal of this project is to create an effective collaborative research tool for all scholars of the period. The creation and maintenance of this database is the centrepiece of this doctoral research project, which will yield a large number of cultural, social, religious, political, economic, and military topics about Jacobite constituency. Designed specifically for the purpose of scholarly examination and prosopographic analysis of a large number of biographic entries, and drawing from a wide variety of sources, JDB1745 will eventually house every name that can be associated with Jacobitism in the years 1740-1759. In effect, this database hopes to offer its users an accurate biographical, social, and cultural atlas of the Forty-five.

This brief introduction will include a survey of resources, methodology, and application, and will be accompanied by a visual presentation of a working sample dataset as well as a cursory explanation of the implemented technology and how the project fits in with the burgeoning field of Digital Humanities.

Jacobite Studies Trust Conference
Saturday, 6 July 2013
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5 rue des Irlandais
75005 Paris

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Something Rotten in Auld Reekie
Through the settling miasma of the failed, final Jacobite rising, Scotland’s capital set about returning to business as usual. But a closer look at the web of evidence given to government officers when turning in suspected Jacobites reveals an undeniably anomalous pattern of accusations by a select number of Edinburgh’s merchants specifically targeting other merchants of the same trade. Prosopographic analysis of Edinburgh’s accused rebels using The Jacobite Database of 1745 has shown evidence of possible skullduggery within the city’s goldsmith community. Further investigation of Jacobite trial depositions, burgess records, and burgh court records is necessary to determine whether the social and fiscal unrest of rebellion provided a fertile environment for Edinburgh merchants to take advantage of the market by eliminating or slandering the competition. This paper will explore these themes, as well as chart the convoluted pattern of accusations to understand the atmosphere of suspicion within the Edinburgh business sector post-Culloden.

Institute of Historical Research
New Directions in Jacobite Studies
Tuesday, 20 August 2013
Senate House, Bedford Room G37
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

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Such Cryptic Warp and Weft
This paper is an introduction to a new codification of the Jacobite record. Utilising a modern and acutely-designed online database to compile and document the constituency of the Jacobite movement during the rising of 1745-6, the goal of this project is to create an effective collaborative research tool for all scholars of the period. The creation and maintenance of this database is the centrepiece of this doctoral research project, which will yield a large number of cultural, social, religious, political, economic, and military topics about Jacobite constituency. Designed specifically for the purpose of scholarly examination and prosopographic analysis of a large number of biographic entries, and drawing from a wide variety of sources, JDB1745 will eventually house every name that can be associated with Jacobitism in the years 1740-1759. In effect, this database hopes to offer its users an accurate biographical, social, and cultural atlas of the Forty-five.

Institute of Scottish Historical Research Reading Weekend
Saturday, 3 March 2012
Stroove House
38 Montgomerie Terrace
Skelmorlie

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JDB1745 is an online relational database specifically designed for the purpose of scholarly research and analysis of a large number of biographic entries. Drawing from a wide variety of sources, its goal is to eventually house every name that can be associated with Jacobitism in the years 1740-1759. Because much of the detailed biographical data of accused or suspected Jacobites are scarce or as of yet undiscovered, approaching this project using prosopographic analysis will help answer many questions about Jacobite constituency during the final rising against the Hanoverian government of George II. The usefulness of this interpretation is that it allows researchers to establish significant characteristics about a large number of subjects through a broad but detailed examination of facts: the entire collection of what facts are known about them and the way those facts interrelate.

No scholar has ever compiled these listings into one consolidated forum; eliminating duplicate names, comparing them against each other to see how the web of relationships was formed, and categorising them by a myriad of different qualifiers to be later examined by a concise and structured thesis. In effect, this database hopes to offer its users an accurate biographical, social, and cultural atlas of the ‘Forty-five.

This rich codification of Jacobite constituency will present everything we currently know about the participants of the ‘Forty-five - with infinite expandability to include future knowledge - and will also provide an invaluable tool for researchers in the fields of history, genealogy, and beyond.